Archive for the ‘Drug Benefit’ Category


Coding accuracy: RESULTS(2)

Oct 31, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Drug Benefit

Prescriptions abstracted

In total, 5155 prescriptions were abstracted. The most common prescriptions were for anti-infective agents, central nervous system , and cardiovascular medications (Table 2) and these three categories accounted for over 7 0% of the medications dispensed. Approximately 70% of prescriptions were dispensed to Ontarians aged 65 years and older and 30% were dispensed to other recipients (people on social assistance and those with high prescription drug costs in relation to their income) (Table 3). Almost 90% of prescriptions were prescribed in clinics or offices, about 87% were written, and physicians prescribed over 98% (1.8% were written by dentists and one prescription was written by a chiropodist).

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Coding accuracy: RESULTS(1)

Oct 30, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Drug Benefit

Coding accuracy: RESULTS(1)

Description of the pharmacies

Of the 183 pharmacy owners invited to participate, consent to abstract information was obtained in 50, yielding a participation rate of 27%. The rate of participation was highest in pharmacies in Brantford/Ancaster/Dundas (all six invited pharmacies agreed to participate) and was lowest in Toronto, where only eight of 99 (8%) owners agreed (most stated that they were “too busy” to allow the research assistant to visit). Fifty-four per cent of participating pharmacies were independent or franchised and 46% were part of larger chains (Table 1).

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Coding accuracy: METHODS(3)

Oct 29, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Drug Benefit

Statistical analyses

For comparison with another sample of prescriptions claims data, DINs were grouped into categories defined by the American Hospital Formulary Listing Pharmacologic-Therapeutic Classification Names (www.ashp.org).

The information on the prescription claim was compared with the electronic claim that was sent to the ODB. Errors in the coding and discrepancies between the prescription and the cheap medications that were actually dispensed were evaluated. It was only possible to identify coding errors (the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values could not be estimated). As such, the true error rate in the ODB database was estimated using a binomial proportion and 95% CI.

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Coding accuracy: METHODS(2)

Oct 28, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Drug Benefit

Coding accuracy: METHODS(2)

A standardized data collection form was used and information was obtained about: the dispensed medication (date, DIN [which contains the dose, active chemical ingredient and manufacturer], route of administration, and quantity of pills); the prescriber (type, location); the prescribing mode (paper/telephone); and the pharmacy (annual volume of dispensed prescriptions, annual number of hours worked by pharmacists and pharmacy assistants). In cases where more than one medication was listed on the prescription, only the first medication was abstracted. When attempting to verify the coding accuracy of the dates, it was only possible to detect errors when the dispensation predated the date of the prescription. It was only possible to detect errors that led to logical inconsistencies. ventolin inhalers

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Coding accuracy: METHODS(1)

Oct 27, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Drug Benefit

A prevalence study was done to audit prescriptions dispensed from 50 community pharmacies in southern Ontario. For each claim, the written information on the prescription was compared with the electronic information submitted to the ODB database. The sampling frame comprised pharmacies from communities in southern Ontario (Hamilton/S toney Creek, Ancaster/Dundas, St Catharines/Niagara Falls/Welland/Grimsby, Burlington/ Mississauga and Toronto). From a list of all 957 pharmacies in these jurisdictions, a random sample of 183 was contacted by mail and invited to participate. To enhance participation rates, $50 was offered to compensate for the time spent preparing the prescriptions and aiding the research assistant. ventolin inhaler

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Coding accuracy of administrative

One study of the Quebec RAMQ medication claims database showed that, of 1.9 million claims for dispensed prescriptions, between 0% and 0.4% of records were either out of range or had missing values in the fields for the individual identifiers, drug, quantity, date dispensed and duration . The accuracy of the information on medications in the RAMQ database was also examined in 723 prescriptions filled by 306 elderly patients attending one internal medicine clinic. Of these prescriptions, 83% were filled and correctly identified the patient and the drug, and in 89% of 5999 records examined, the prescribing physician was correctly identified . The quantity and duration of the prescriptions were accurate in 69.1% and 72.1% of records, respectively. However, there is no published information on the reliability of coding on the ODB drug claims database. asthma inhalers

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In Ontario, all medications can be prescribed by physicians. Other health professionals including dentists, chiropodists, midwives and optometrists are permitted to prescribe medications that are used in the course of engaging in the practice of his or her profession. Prescriptions are the instructions from the prescriber directing the dispensing of a drug or mixture of drugs — buy antibiotics online for a designated person, which are subsequently dispensed by pharmacists. A pharmacist dispensing a medication for an ODB beneficiary in a community pharmacy receives remuneration after submitting a claim to the ODB.

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Ontario Drug Benefit database(1)

In Canada between 1975 and 1996, expenditures on all drugs increased from $1.2 to $10.8 billion, and their share of total health spending rose from 9.7% to 14.4%. Prescription cialis professional made up about 70% of this total in 1994 . Given the level of spending and the important role of pharmacotherapy in modern medicine, research on medication use is essential. Important sources of information on medications prescribed and dispensed in the general population are drug claims databases such as those maintained by the Ontario Drug Benefit (ODB) program.

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