Archive for the ‘Paediatric’ Category


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE: DR ROB HILL
Dr Hill graduated in medicine from Oxford University (Oxford, United Kingdom) in 1950, continuing his training and practice in London (United Kingdom), Malaysia, Singapore and Paris (France). His early paediatric training took place at Children’s Hospital in Boston (Massachusetts), and in 1959, he came to Vancouver, British Columbia as chief resident.
He entered general paediatric practice in 1960 and subsequently became part-time Medical Director of Sunny Hill Hospital (Vancouver). In 1964, he was appointed Director of the Children’s Arthritis Program of the Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society.
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 A career in paediatrics (part 4)

Paediatricians frequently land in administration or in situations with a large administrative component. Perhaps this is because they have gained experience with the conflicts of childhood and are thought to have gained expertise in their resolution; adult behaviour, after all, being similar.

My own experience as a paediatrician has ranged from 12 years spent mostly in primary care, through a period as a teacher and consultant, to appointments of an administrative nature, and finally, a stint as academic department head. I had no idea that my career would go through these stages, but they have all been satisfying. I urge you to keep your mind open to an alternative career move. It is tempting to stay in a comfortable position but a change can be invigorating.
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A career in paediatrics (part 3)

I got involved with children with longterm disabilities – specifically with rheumatic diseases but then, in an institutional setting, with more severe neurological handicaps. I found myself the member of a team – no longer the sole author of opinion conveyed to parents and others. I learned more about the assessment of physical and mental function, but I had to realize that I knew less in these fields than the physiotherapist or the psychologist. They could be critical of my comparatively amateurish conclusions, but I found that I was sometimes right and that a broader background could be helpful, particularly if I could establish a good rapport with the child. Intense concentration on one particular aspect of a child’s function could lead to a false emphasis, or missing the wood for the trees.
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When I started as a junior partner in a predominantly primary care practice (this was the pattern for nearly all paediatricians in Vancouver, British Columbia at the time), I was confronted with all the concerns about which young mothers expect advice from the paediatrician. I found myself reaching back to recommendations I remembered from my own mother rather than to anything I had learned in preparation for the specialty examinations. Because I had children of my own, this information was supplemented from personal experience. I knew a little about growth and development, but nothing about child or adult education, and I had been taught no child psychology. Behavioural disorders and school adjustment problems were among the most common conditions for which distraught parents consulted the paediatrician, and I had minimal (and out of date) knowledge of the school system, let alone much understanding of family dynamics. Some of the problems seemed clearly to fall in the realm of psychiatry, but it took forever to get an appointment with a psychiatrist and sometimes longer still to receive any report.
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I presume that you went into paediatrics because you were interested in, and liked to work with children (if not, you should do something else). You will be aware of the alternative career paths available to the graduating paediatrician, from a predominantly primary care practice to one that is exclusively consultant, and perhaps subspecialty positions involving teaching and research. Paediatricians often get involved in other fields, such as public health, and it is not unusual for them to get into administration: in a child care facility, at a university or elsewhere.

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