Archive for the ‘Plastic surgery’ Category


The earliest skin grafts in Canada (part 5)

Aug 11, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Plastic surgery

The earliest skin grafts in Canada (part 5)

On January 17, two small patches of skin were obtained from the arm, between half a pea and a pea in size, and grafted onto the granulations of the ulcer. The patient developed erysipelas 10 days later, but did not lose the grafts. On February 14, the area round the grafts, which had been peripherally placed, was healed, but not the central portion. Two more small grafts were taken from the arm and one of these survived. On March 11, an unhealed area of 1 by X inches was grafted and the area was healed within a week.
(more…)

The earliest skin grafts in Canada (part 4)

Aug 10, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Plastic surgery

Dr Hingston also said that in fuiure cases he would attempt to use the method suggested by Mr Fiddes of Aberdeen, who used a long scalpel or razor to shave or scrape off ‘epidermal scales’ from the convex parts of the extremities, ie, the outer convex aspects of the forearms and thighs. These would be placed on the healthy granul ations and fixed in place with ordinary adhesive plaster. Dr Hingston agreed with Dr Pollock, an English surgeon, “that a tribute of admiration and gratitude is due to M. Reverdin from the profession, for the boon he has conferred upon surgery, by this original method of dealing with large and obstinate ulcers”.

First skin grafts in Canada? (more…)

The earliest skin grafts in Canada (part 3)

Aug 9, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Plastic surgery

The first dressing change was done 48 h later. An amount of retained pus was released. No trace of the grafts could be seen. Disappointingly enough, no grafts were visible when the dressing was changed the next day. However, on the fourth day, a leaden-white speck was visible at the site of one of the grafts. A day later, the two other grafts, “or the products thereof’, were visible. Over the ensuing days the specks of grafts grew quickly in size. On the 20th day, the ulcer was completely closed except for a space the size of a pea, between the grafts. During this period, the patient was kept on complete bed rest.
(more…)

The earliest skin grafts in Canada (part 2)

Aug 8, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Plastic surgery

The earliest skin grafts in Canada

At the Medico-Chirurgical Society of Montreal held on April 1, 1871, Dr Wili iam Hingston read a paper eniiiled ‘Skin Grafting’. (Dr Hingston was one of Canada’s most illustrious surgeons in the second half of the 19th century. He was on the staff at the Hotel Dieu Hospital in Montreal for over 50 years, and was knighted by Queen Victoria in 1895.) He described two cases of chronic leg ulcers which were treated with skin grafts at the Hotel Dieu Hospital. The first involved a 72-year-old patient who was admitted on February 7, 1871, with an ulcer of the leg which had troubled him almost continually for 23 years. It was deep, spoon shaped, and on the inside of the tibia. It measured 4 by 3)4 inches, and was covered with an offensive, unhealthy looking greenish fluid. There were only a few pale granulations and the edges of the ulcer were thick and hard.
(more…)

The earliest skin grafts in Canada (part 1)

Aug 7, 2012 Author: Walter Mcneil | Filed under: Plastic surgery

The earliest skin grafts in Canada (part 1)

A summary of the Medico-Chirurgical Society of Montreal of April 1, 1871, is presented. In this meeting are presented what I believe to be the first reports of skin grafts in Canada, performed at two hospitals, each without knowledge that it was being performed elsewhere in the city. Even at this early stage, the basic requirements of grafting ulcers were clearly elucidated, and gratitude expressed to Dr Jacques Re-verdin, who devised the procedure.
(more…)

Categories


Advertising


Most Popular

  • None found

Recent Comments

  • None found