Archive for the ‘Transdermal Scopolamine’ Category


Treatment of Chronic Symptomatic Supraventricular Bradyarrhythmias with Transdermal Scopolamine: DiscussionScopolamine (hyoscine) is a competitive inhibitor of the muscarinic receptors of acetylcholine and has pharmacologic actions similar to those of atropine. The usefulness of this drug has been limited by its relatively short duration of action and high incidence of side effects when administered orally or parenterally. The transdermal system of administration is designed to deliver the scopolamine into the systemic circulation over an extended period similar to a slow intravenous infusion. The patch itself is 2.5 cm2 in area and has a reservoir layer containing 1.5 mg of scopolamine. About 0.5 mg of the drug passes from this reservoir through a micro-porous polypropylene membrane and the intact skin to enter the systemic circulation at a steady rate over a period of 72 hours. A continuous controlled release of scopolamine occurs to maintain the plasma concentration at a steady level. The transdermal system of administration of scopolamine is currently used for the prevention of nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness. (more…)

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  • The chest x-ray film findings, serum thyroxine level, complete blood count, and serum electrolyte concentrations were normal. The patient was admitted to the coronary care unit. During cardiac monitoring, the predominant rhythm was AV junctional rhythm (Fig 1A) with and without AV dissociation with an average rate of 32 beats per minute. There were numerous asystolic periods (Fig IB) lasting up to 4.4 s. There were also frequent multifocal ventricular premature beats (VPBs), numerous VPB couplets, and three 3-4 beat runs of ventricular tachycardia. During a period of slow AV junctional rhythm, a single dose of atropine, 1 mg, was administered intravenously and this produced a brief acceleration of the AV junctional rate from 30 to 60 beats per minute. (more…)

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  • Treatment of Chronic Symptomatic Supraventricular Bradyarrhythmias with Transdermal ScopolamineChronic persistent or intermittent symptomatic bradyar-rhythmias of sinus, atrial or atrioventricular (AV) junctional origin are customarily treated by implantation of a permanent cardiac pacemaker. The management of such arrhythmias can present a challenge in patients in whom permanent pacemaker implantation may not be indicated, such as in the demented or terminally ill. Repeated oral administration of atropine or sublingual administration of isoproterenol may reduce frequency or magnitude of supraventricular bradyarrhythmias, but these therapeutic modalities commonly produce unacceptable side effects and are not without risk. This report describes a demented patient whose supraventricular bradyarrhythmias substantially improved following the application of transdermal scopolamine. (more…)

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